Boulissa and its Variations, A Discussion on a Name

Assembled by S. Alfassa

From November 3 - 10 2000 a bright, stimulating, and in-depth conversation opened up on the Sephardic Discussion List over a single word (one which was a common Sephardic woman's name) "Boulissa." It is provided here for those who have asked for the entire discussion.

Nov. 3, 2000

Prof. Jacob Nachmias asked:

What are the origin of the following Judeo-Spanish words:

>nikuchira >svaneser (svanesido) >boyo >bourmuelo

NIKUCHIRA derives from the Greek word: Nekokiera or Nekokhiera in Greek, which means Housewife. By the way, the Yerosolemite Sephardi used another word for Nikuchira, it was Balabaya which derives itself from the Hebrew Baalat Bayit.

It is perhaps the place to remind the feminine given name BULISSA which was current in the Ottoman Empire countries till the beginning of the 20th cent.

BULISSA derives from the Yiddish nickname " BALABUSTE"- housewife. The origin is the Hebrew BAALAT BAYIT. It has been deformed by the Yiddish pronounciation of Hebrew. There were "export-import" of word and given names between the Ashkenazi community and the Sephardi one. But this is for another chapter. BOURMUELO derives from the Spanish word bunuelo (with a tilde on the n) which is a kind of pastry fried in hot deep oil, very similar to our Pessah bourmuelos also called bumuelos or bimuelos (with the r). In Haketia , the Judeo-Spanish spoken in North Morocco, they used the word "binuelo" for a kind a doughnut but not eaten during Pessah.

Shalom from JERUSALEM, Mathilde Tagger


Nov. 3, 2000

In 1975 I met an old and wise Sephardic woman who was reviewing some family history .. the name "Boulissa" came up and she told me that it meant ... "little sister", but I've not been able to find confirmation for that. I have often wondered about this female name. Was it a real given name or a "nickname".

The way it was explained to me it was a "nickname". Does it really come from the Yiddish like Mathilde suggests, or does it mean something else? I don't feel comfortable thinking that a name like Boulissa evolves from a Yiddish word ... with all the Sephardic originality for borrowing from the Greek, and Turkish, and original Spanish, why would they have to use an Ashkenazi (Yiddish) word? How would it have crept into the vocabulary?

Does anyone have other suggestions for the meaning of "Boulissa"? Is the "issa" ending a suffix for anything that might give a clue?

David Sheby
Cherry Hill, New Jersey


Nov 3, 2000

Dear all, Bolissa (or Bulissa) is, according to several peoples fluent in arabic, an arabization of the french first name "Pauline" and does not come from Yddisch. I am not an expert in that matter and I only report what I heard.

Regards
Remi Hakim (Paris, France)


Nov. 4, 2000

Boulissa was my aunt's given name (of blessed memory). She was born in Salonika, about 1900 and arrived in New York 12/25/19. For all her remaining years she used Bessie as a first name, which she probably believed was an Americanized version of Boulissa.

George and Dolores


Nov. 4, 2000

Dear David, Dear Friends,

David Sheby wrote: >In 1975 I met an old and wise Sephardic woman who was reviewing some >family history .. the name "Boulissa" came up and she told me >that it meant ... "little sister", but I've not been able to find >confirmation for that. >I have often wondered about this female name. Was it a real given name or >a "nickname". The way it was explained to me it was a "nickname". Does it >really come from the Yiddish like Mathilde suggests, or does it mean >something else? I don't feel comfortable thinking that a name >like Boulissa evolves from a Yiddish word ... with all the Sephardic >originality for >borrowing from the Greek, and Turkish, and original Spanish, why would they >have to use an Ashkenazi (Yiddish) word? How would it have crept into the >vocabulary?

I found the explanation of BULISSA deriving from the Yiddish "BALABUSTE" in the book of Shlomo Rozanes: Divrei Yemei Yisrael beTogarma [History of the Jews in Turkey]. Tel Aviv, Devir, 1930. Part I, p.261. as part of a chapter dedicated to the Ashkenazi Jews in Turkey (p.238). There is another feminine given name: ROBISSA which derives from the Yiddisch Rubitsa or Rebitse that means the "wife of the Rabbi". Rozanes adds a list of surnames having their origin in Ashkenazi Jews who arrived in Turkey just before the Expulsed Jews from Spain arrived there. Another source is an addendum to the following Hebrew book of Responsae: Rab. Eliahu Hazan [Alexandria Chief Rabbi]: Taalumot Lev. Livorno, 1893.

That part is a dictionary for feminine given names with their meaning/ origin, and their Hebrew spelling (important for fixing the identity of a woman in a divorce document). For Bulissa, E.Hazan explains that it is usually a nickname, but sometimes a real given name. According to Hazan, this name is of "foreign" origin and he insists on its spelling: with an "Aleph" at the end and not with a "Hei" as for Gracia, Esperansa, Stella for example. Usually Hazan indicates the origin as Spanish, Italian, Arabic etc.. , all the roots of the Sephardi Jews. Hazan has the same policy for REBISSA.

I would like here to open a parenthese and try to explain why parents gave such strange names to their baby-girls, as "houswife" and "wife a the Rabbi". In the Jewish tradition, Sephardim, Ashkenazi and Mizrahim, the birth of a baby-boy was received as a real blessing, while the birth a baby-girl was received without great happiness. That's why the 'disappointed' parents, by calling the girl Bulissa or Robissa, tried to say: OK! It's girl but she will be a very good housewife" or "OK! it's a girl but at least she will be the wife of a Rabbi". I am quite sure that in the 19th century and perhaps earlier, no one naming his girl so, didn't know the exact meaning. As to the suggestion brouth by Remy Hakim, that Bulissa was the deformation of Pauline, in fact the contrary happened. With the introduction of French culture by the Alliance Israelite Universelle schools, grand-daughter to a Bulissa grandmother was called Pauline, because of a phonetic similarity. This was the case for example for Luna which became Louise, for Mazaltov which became Mathilde etc.. etc.. By the way Paula/Pauline was also given instead on Palomba. Sorry for being so long, but onomastics such an interesting field!

Shalom from JERUSALEM Mathilde Tagger


Nov. 5, 2000

As a young boy growing in Istanbul, I remember that the term "Boulissa" referred to the Rabbi's wife.

J.E.Botton


Nov. 5, 2000

In my dictionary, "The Sephardic Folk Dictionary" on page 139 and on page 101 of the bible of Sephardic dictionaries "Dictionaire Du Judeo Epagnol by David Nehama", you will find the name Bulisa means woman, wife, lady...usually the older sister.

In my family, My aunt Bulisa Sheby was my father's oldest sister and she was married to a man my father called Basya. Basya may not have been his given name....it was a name of respect. Basya is usually a respectful title given to the husband of the oldest sister, the oldest son in law. In my family they were given the highest respect. It was only after my aunt died that my cousin told me that his mother's name was not Bulisa but another name that I cannot remember; but I always knew them as aunt Bulissa and Uncle Basya.

I want to thank George and Dolores (dolsa@ate.net) for their kind words and would enjoy exchanging thoughts with them....And to Mrs. Arditi in re to her reminising her uncle Jose (?) Estrugo.......His book was one of the first ones I encountered....I didn't know him but I liked him.

OK now! Lets let "Bulisa" lie in peace! As for the spelling and pronunciation of other Sephardic words discussed some are correct and others are not. We must remember that Ladino (in many instances) can mean different things. My pontification is now finished.


Nov. 6, 2000

Dear M. Al Passy, Dear Friends, >apassy @aol.com wrote: >Lets let "Bulisa" lie in peace!

My reply on BULISA origin/meaning was based on two major books in the research of the Ottoman Jews history/genealogy and onomastics, the Honorable Shlomo Rosanes (well known among Sephardi genealogists) and His Excellency Chief Rabbi Eliahu Hazan (unfortunately less known). In explaining the meaning of the two given names: BULISA and REBISA and the circumstances in which they were given in the very past times, I had certainly not the intention to offend anyone and of course not your beloved aunt's memory. I am so sorry that I have irritated you. Really sorry!

Dear M. Al Passy, my sincere wish is to continue reading your questions/ replies and those of all the other suscribers of this fantastic Sephardic Discussion List. These are, perhaps, the last words on BULISA and REBISA, these two Sefardi feminine given names, that have their roots in... the Yiddisch language.

Shalom from Jerusalem, Mathilde Tagger


Nov. 6, 2000

Here I (David Sheby) reposted the note from Mr. Passy:

>In my dictionary, "The Sephardic Folk Dictionary" on page 139 and on page >101 of the bible of Sephardic dictionaries "Dictionaire Du Judeo Epagnol by >David Nehama", you will find the name Bulisa means woman, wife, >lady...usually the older sister. >In my family, My aunt Bulisa Sheby was my father's oldest sister and she was >married to a man my father called Basya.

I find it very interesting that Al's definition touches upon the concept of "sister". But he uses it to be the "older" sister, not "little sister", as it was once explained to me. The thought that the beautiful name Boulissa comes from Ashkenazi words (Mathilde's research) or Arabicized Pauline (Remi's suggestion) remains unpleasant for me: it strictly an emotional reponse ... but Al Passy's note about the Nehama reference gives me an idea which I offer for discussion.

Fact 1: Nehama (as referenced by Al) states: Bulisa (accent aigu over the i), bulisu (accent aigu over the u) Une autre forme de 'bula' (accent aigu over the u) voir ce mot. (i.e., Boulissa is a form of the word "bula"; see that word) Then Nehama defines "bula" as "titre pare lequel on interpell une femme du peuple d'un certain age) Also, after several secondary definitions, "la bula" is defined as "l'epouse, mon epouse". (A name given to a woman of a certain age, or someone's wife??) I don't see the word sister ("soeur") which is what I am looking for.

Fact 2: But 'bula" suggests another avenue ... I have a reprint of the Redhouse "Turkish and English Lexicon" published in 1890. (see: http://www.sephardicstudies.org/cal3.html, Paragraph 1.4 for details) There is a 4 letter Ottoman word "bola" on page 407 (spelled in osmanlica with English equivalents) The Hebrew letter equivalents would be"beyt vuv lamed aleph". This word is defined as "the wife of one's paternal uncle".

Fact 3: We know from Haham Isaac Jerusalmi's book "From Ottoman Turkish to Ladino" that some Ladino words definitely come from Turkish. One example (forgive use of wrong letters for the Turkish) he gives (p. 1, Introduction), Turkish word "hanim" ("lady") plus Ladino suffix "ika" to create word "hanumika" (which he defines as a "Sephardic woman pretty but also graceful, vivacious , ..refined.....")

Questions: Could "bola" be a Turkish candidate (but we don't know if it is pure Turkish word or borrowed from elsewhere) for a root word to which a suffix was added? Is Boulissa related to the Turkish word "bola"?. If it is borrowed, then what does the suffix "issa" add to this word? Does anyone know how Boulissa is spelled in Hebrew letters? Does the suffix "issa" appear in other Ladino words or phrases? If so, in what context is it used? If "Boulissa" is rooted in Turkish, with some form of suffix, then what exactly does it mean in Ladino?

David Sheby
Cherry Hill


Nov. 7, 2000

Question: could it have its root in- Turkish?

Dear David, Dear Friends, David Sheby wrote:

>Questions: >Could "bola" be a Turkish candidate (but we don't know if it is pure Turkish word or borrowed from elsewhere) for a root word to which a suffix was added? >Is Boulissa related to the Turkish word "bola"?. >If it is borrowed, then what does the suffix "issa" add to this word? >Does anyone know how Boulissa is spelled in Hebrew letters? >Does the suffix "issa" appear in other Ladino words or phrases? If so, in >what context is it used? >If "Boulissa" is rooted in Turkish, with some form of suffix, then what >exactly does it mean in Ladino?

Chief Rabbi Eliahu Hazan wrote BULISSA in Hebrew: Beit- Vav - Lamed - Yod - Samekh - Aleph - About the suffix "issa" : In my personal database of Sephardi feminine given names (ca700 items) there is only one other name ending with "issa". It is "Melissa", which is the Greek word for "Bee" (Dictionary of first names. Oxford, Oxford Univ. Press, 1994) The "issa" suffix sounds to me very Slavic. But of course, I may be wrong. Here are the diminutive forms I found for Bulissa ( I am NOT speaking about names given under French/American etc.. influences. ): BOL, BOLA, BELISSIA, BUSSA and BUTSA (the 2 last ones -especially in Bulgaria).

Shalom from Jerusalem, Mathilde Tagger


Nov. 8, 2000

"Bola" is not a turkish word.

J.Botton


Nov. 8, 2000

There is a word in Portuguese rebolica meaning- rounded- of a rounded nature. Phonetically, it sounds boulissa. Just a thought. Perhaps a word picked up in the great trajectory to Istanbul from Lisbon.

Maria VS


Nov. 9, 2000

Comment about bola? what's the basis of your comment?

Jacob Nachmias wrote: > There is of course also the word 'bola' in modern Spanish, which means > 'ball' more or less (among other things). > > ~ So where does "bola" come from? It's in the Redhouse dictionary?

Mr. Nachmias, BOLICHE is a Spanish word that means LITTLE STORE.

Dr. Arditi


Nov. 9, 2000

Comment about bola? what's the basis of your comment?

There is of course also the word 'bola' in modern Spanish, which means 'ball' more or less (among other things). ~ So where does "bola" come from? It's in the Redhouse dictionary? ... I

don't know what the Redhouse Dictionary is, but I looked up 'bola' in the Oxford Turkish-English dictionary. I found no entry for 'bola'. The closest was 'bol' which means 'wide, loose, ample, copious, abundant'. Incidentally, there is also a word "boliche" - bolic(tilde)e, which is defined as 'Jewess'.

(Jacob Nachmias)


Nov. 9, 2000

[Mr. Botton wrote: ]

"Bola" is not a turkish word. " (J.Botton)

Comment about bola? what's the basis of your comment Body: So where does "bola" come from? It's in the Redhouse dictionary? Shall I scan it for you and post it somewhere for you to examine? It's on page 407, right hand column, third word from the bottom with a small T in front of it indicating it's Turkish. The definition is "the wife of one's paternal uncle". What is the basis of your comment to disgard this? Please remember that if you were raised in the Republic of Turkey then your vocabulary is slightly different than that of the Ottoman Turks.

Regards David Sheby
Cherry Hill, New Jersey


Nov. 9, 2000

From Al Passy--My comment about Bola from [what] David Sheby [wrote]:

My aunt Boulisa who was the eldest daughter was indeed married to her Uncle Basya which made him the eldest son in law....as a matter of fact, David Sheby is a distant relative...which I am proud to relate . aman efendim, "so much ado about Boulisa" !

If you want some interesting names here are some belonging to my realtives.do any of these names ring a bell? My aunts Kalochi. Luna, Refka, Neama, Oro or my uncle Ishadya? My father came from a small village in Gallipoli Turkey where Boulisa and Basya were married. Many marriages were conducted between close relatives. Uncles neices and 1st cousins were permitted to marry. Aunts were not permitted to marry nephews. Maybe someone can explain this to me. Probably has something to do with the genes. Many close marriages occured with the Turkinos from Rhodes...In this day and age Rhodesli funerals attract huge turnouts because so many are related to each other.

Al Passy is my name and pontification is my game Shalom!


Nov. 9, 2000

~~ The wife of a paternal uncle in turkish is "baldiz" ( i without the dot). - ~ Although the ~ alphabet was changed after the founding of the Turkish Republic in 1923, the ~ voca- ~ bulary was not, for several decades afterward. ~ ~ J.Botton

I hate to prolong this discussion yet further, but the Oxford Turkish-English dictionary says that 'baldiz' (with dotless i) mesns wife's sister, sister in law.

Jacob Nachmias


Nov. 9, 2000

Boulissa, Redhouse Dictionary & TSA's H-TURK responses:

>I don't know what the Redhouse Dictionary is, but I looked up 'bola' > in the Oxford Turkish-English dictionary. I found no entry for >'bola'. The closest was 'bol' which means 'wide, loose, ample, >copious, abundant'. Incidentally, there is also a word "boliche" - >bolic(tilde)e, which is defined as 'Jewess'. > >There is of course also the word 'bola' in modern Spanish, which means >'ball' more or less (among other things).

Dear Mr. Nachmias and others on the Sephardic Discussion List. You can't always depend on "modern" Turkish or modern Turkish dictionaries to discover the meaning of a word. Modern Turkish has been sanitized/cleansed of many older word forms coming from Persian and other foreign sources. The Redhouse dictionary was the defacto English-OTTOMAN Turkish dictionary in the 1800's: the most definitive (in terms of corrections) and final edition was published in 1890.

I personally have found it very useful to be a member of the Turkish Studies Association (TSA) (http://bsuvc.bsu.edu/~tsa/) I receive the TSA Bulletin to find new archival sources that may be of relevance to Sephardic genealogy. (Note: one of the benefits of this work has been the efforts to find studies on Ottoman manufacturing to find lists of Sephardic merchants, workers, guild members, etc.) A new addition to the Sephardic History and Genealogy Section (Sephardic Archival Material ) (cf: http://www.sephardicstudies.org/entrance.html) that will shortly be available will discuss some of the benefits of such professional/academic research organizations.

One of TSA's great tools is their own discussion list "H-TURK "The Turkish Studies Electronic Mailing List) (see: http://www2.h-net.msu.edu/~turk/). In fact if you go to the H-TURK site, you will see that I recently posted the "Boulissa" question to that list. I received 2 responses, and wrote to the authors for permission to reprint their replies on this list. Permission was received.

The respondees were the prominent Turkologist Robert Dankoff from the University of Chicago, and the unique Professor Minna Rozen.

You can read the original responses at: http://www2.h-net.msu.edu/~turk/. (Note: Professor Rozen's remarks are reposted with 1 minor change at her request).

Response of Robert Dankoff on H-Turk List

Concerning bula: Tarama Sozlugu, II, 686-687 has several references from the 14th and 15th centuries in the meaning "elder sister; lady of the house". From the seventeenth century, Meninski (p. 938) defines it as a term used in Istanbul for "aunt" (this is Redhouse's bola), and Evliya Celebi uses it in the meaning "servant woman; midwife".

Robert Dankoff

(Note from D. Sheby) Significance: The Turks in the 1300's and 1400's were using the word "bula" (written in Redhouse as "bola") to mean elder sister. This is the context that Al Passy used. We also see that the definition was as "aunt" which is exactly what the Redhouse dictionary provided!! ------ Response of Professor Minna Rozen on H-Turk List (with word correction)

A woman's "name": "Boulissa" [from Minna Rozen] Date Posted: Tue, 7 Nov 2000

A booklet prepared by Rabbi Avraham Mutal from Salonika ( Was the Hakham of Lisbon Congregation, died on 1658) gave in detail the correct Hebrew transliteration of names, intended to assist Rabbis in writing properly bills of divorcement. The booklet was cited several times by various rabbinical scholars like Hayim Yosef David Azulai, Mosheh Ibn Haviv etc. It is also cited by Rozanes, vol. 1,pp.209-212. On page 211 it says: "Boula Khursi- a name given by the Gregos (Romaniots) to their daughters. Also among the women of the Gentile Greeks the name is found.I have heard that they write the name with a "Khaf" [that is the name khoursi] Since this name is taken from the Greek Gentiles when written for a Jewish woman it should be written with a khaf....AND BOULA IS AN ADJUNCT NAME WHILE KHOURSI IS THE NOUN, AND IN A PLACE IN WHICH IT IS THE HABIT TO WRITE ADJUNCTS ES [IN THE BILL OF DIVORCEMENT],IF IT HAPPENED THAT THE BOULA WAS WRITTEN BEFORE THE KHOURSI OR AFTER IT, IT DOES NOT MAKE A DIFFERENCE" (that is the bill is valid).

In short the name Boula started as a sort of title added to a Greek or Romaniot first name. I went hastily through the inventory of Haskoy cemetery 1582-1800. The name appears many times simply as a first name of a woman, and many times as a title of female name , mostly of Romaniot origin , but not always, for example there were Zimrah Boulisa, Leah Boulisa,Boula Menorah , Boula Esteroula, etc. Strange enough Boula Khoursi disappeared as if the earth had devoured her.. Boulisa is a sort of diminutive of Boula. I did not find the name in a Greek dictionary, on the other hand Redhouse dictionary (1968ed.) says Bula : elder sister, PROVINCIAL, in other words, the equivalent of abla. An adjunct becoming a first name is not rare in this society ,for example the Greek adjunct name Kira which should normally appear as Kira Esther, Kira Irini, Kira Anasta, appears on the Jewish tombstones as a first name of a female just Kira, that is to say Lady.

Hope to have satisfied your curiousity, All the best Minna Rozen.

(Note from D. Sheby) Significance: Professor Rozen provides evidence that the term Boula may have preceeded the Turks by being Romanoit names (for explanation see, for example, http://www.sephardicstudies.org/gallipoli.html) who lived within the Byzantine Empire prior to the Ottoman conquest of these lands. So the name may have been adapted by the Turks from the earlier Greek language that was prevalent. This ties in with the notes sent to this list dealing with the "issa" ending on Melissa (whether this ending is "Greek" or Latin doesn't matter: it was used by Greek speakers". Hence it's not unreasonable to think that -issa could have been added to the term Bula. The evidence seems to indicate that the Sephardim adapted this word from either their Ottoman or Romanoit neighbors. Whether or not the Romanoits and/or Ottomans got the word "Bula/Boula" from Yiddish is something I don't care to investigate.

I have enjoyed this little exercise in trying to find the source for "Boulissa". I hope that the readers have seen the diverse sources that are available for hunting down a question in Sephardic genealogy: (1) Ladino dictionaries written in English and French (2) Ottoman language dictionaries (3) Turkish-studies specialists who in turn provided data from: (i) Sephardic gravestones (ii) Sephardic rabbinic "responsa" material (iii) Ottoman historical source material. This is how Sephardic history/genealogy has to be tracked down until the ULTIMATE sourcebook on Ottoman Sephardic genealogy is written (I wonder if these notes are going to appear in a book that I hear is in preparation??)

I want to emphasize that in no way were my inquiry and questions on the name "Boulissa" cast any questions on my dear friend Mathilde Tagger whose research on the name catalyzed my curiosity. Mathilde is the upper echelons of the most original, intelligent, creative, and diligent people that I know! Her scholarship is impeccable. She is one of the most original and knowledgeable people who can truly be considered a Sephardic historian, genealogist, and archivist. Her contributions are immeasurable! I hold her in the highest esteem and regard, and she is a constant inspiration to me!

(Late note: another posting has just appeared on H-Turk: see: http://www2.h-net.msu.edu/~turk/) which I don't yet have permission to repost: but it states that in Bulgarian "bula" is a Turkish lady; and that there is a related word "bulka" in Bulgarian" (Remember: Bulgaria was part of the Ottoman Empire until 1878!) Read the H-Turk response for the full informative response

Sincerely,

David Sheby


Nov. 9, 2000

Boulissa: another input from HTURK: what Bulgarian sources say Body:

Dear Sephardic Discussion List: I just received written permission from another HTURK contributor (Ulrich Büchsenschütz from Berlin) to repost his most interesting response to my TSA-HTURK inquiry on "Bouissa". His posting (original at: http://www2.h-net.msu.edu/~turk/) states the following:

To: TSA/H-Net List for Turkish and Ottoman History and Culture "bula" in Bulgarian means amongst others "Turkish lady" -- that's what my Bulgarian-German Dictionary says (Tuerkin); there is another similar word in Bulgarian: bulka "bride, wife", but as I am not a linguist I would not go so far as to say that these words are linked. There is an entry bula in the Pomak-Greek dictionary as well, saying it means "megali adelfi" (good female friend). Pomak in this case means the language of the slavic speaking muslim minority of the Rhodope mountains between Greece and Bulgaria, a language of which Bulgarians say it is a mere dialect of standard Bulgarian.

Best regards Ulrich Büchsenschütz Berlin

(Note from D. Sheby): Significance of above: "Bula" seems to be a left over word in Bulgarian from its Ottoman domination. Remember, Bulgarian became independent from Ottoman Turkey in 1878. That the word "bula" appears within a Moslem minority (this are remnants of Ottoman Turkish citizens who stayed within Bulgarian Territory) in the Rhodope Mountains is very significant .. it ties in with Minna Rozen's information that the name was common among Gentile Greeks and Romanoits (Greek speaking Jews who preceded Ottoman occupation and later Sephardic immigration). I think it's fairly obvious now that the word "bula"/"bola" was used in the Ottoman Empire before 1923, and that it has enough parallel/similar meanings to suggest that Boulissa somehow is derived from this word. It also seems to have been a word adapted by the Sephardim from their Romanoit neighbors.

Regards,
David Sheby
Cherry Hill, New Jersey


Nov. 10, 2000

The bulgarian word "bulka"

More on bulgarian origin of ¨boulissa¨¨ The bulgarian word ¨bulka¨, which means bride, has nothing to do with ¨boulissa¨.

The word ¨bulca¨comes from the bulgarian word ¨¨boulo¨, which means ¨veil¨. So ¨boulka¨is a woman who is veiled. No relation to ¨boulissa¨.

It seems to me that after receiving the explanation received from Mina Rosen, the subject is exhausted.

Joseph Covo (bulgarian born and educated)

 


 

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